Online Gambling Upheaval Occurs in Canada

Online gambling thrived in Canada for years. The situation may be changing. Recent news about the expansion of online gaming in the stricter United States would seemingly indicate the world has become friendlier to the best casino websites that have solid reputations. In Canada, online gaming will be facing restrictions.

The gambling industry in Canada generates billions of dollars per year. Online gambling ventures serve as a lucrative tax source for the nation. These enterprises must also follow strict rules. At present, an online casino may not maintain a physical presence in Canada. The law helps protect provincial casinos required to acquire operational licenses.

Worries do exist now about lost tax dollars. If the best casino websites that players prefer lack a physical presence in Canada, the government can't tax the revenues. As more people turn to online casinos, the tax and profit-generating provincial casinos see revenues decline. Concerns reached the point the Canadian government wishes to do something about the matter.

In Quebec, a 2016 law dubbed Bill 74 banned online casinos through blocking their ISPs. The move sought to even the playing field for EspaceJeux, an online casino based in the province. EspaceJeux noticed a definite trend with its revenue streams. A decline started and did not let up. The reasons for the decline weren't too complicated to figure out. Competition from online casinos took away large numbers of players. That's the way the market works. When a better deal arises, consumers go elsewhere.

On the surface, the new regulation established in Quebec made sense since EspaceJeux was suffering due to an adherence to reasonable rules. Cutting back on competition in the market, however, comes with potential problems. A lack of competition can create complacency. Businesses often fail to give in to consumer demands when no competition exists, considering the best casino websites are also highly competitive. Stagnation abounds.

Bill 74 isn't the law of the land yet. Concerns arose over the constitutionality of the bill. Questions exist whether Quebec has the legal authority to enact the legislation. Opponents suggest only the Government of Canada and the CRTC, a government regulator of telecommunications, maintain the necessary jurisdiction.

The Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (CWTA) filed suit to block the law. The CRTC agreed with the CWTA. Currently, the law remains in limbo pending further litigation. In time, the matter should be sorted out through a decision at the Supreme Court. Predictions about the eventual final ruling may prove challenging to make. No one knows how the Supreme Court will ultimately act.

The winds of online gambling growth seem sturdy across the globe. In Canada, however, the winds might be headed towards stillness.

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