Poker is making players rich. Can online casinos do the same?

Pocketing a 7-figure amount in poker winnings is certainly not something to scoff at. In fact, it only makes players more intent on sharing in the wealth that a lucky hand can bring. Should hopeful parents then rather invest in poker lessons than that of golf or tennis? Some would emphatically agree. And in light of recent epic poker wins, wives should be less likely to complain when their husbands take time out to have a poker night with the boys. If they truly hone their skills, who knows, they might be destined for the big leagues and a life-changing win, if not multiple wins.

To win big, you have to bet big. And buy-ins at land-based casinos can be costly. It’s therefore not advisable for a rookie player to put his life’s savings on the line for an outside chance of striking it lucky. One such event, which raised a few eyebrows when first launched in 2011, is the Aussie Millions $250,000 Super High Roller, with a buy-in of a quarter of a million. This one-day event might have had a very hefty price tag, but for Erik Seidel, who took top honours and an attractive $2.5 million first prize, it was certainly worth it. Obviously not many players can afford to pay such a pricey entry fee, but organisers were still astounded to see 20 players sign on. Five years on, it’s still going strong along with many other big buy-in poker tourneys paying out record-breaking sums.

Want to pave your way to competing with the professionals? Here’s how others have done it. Many take part in tournaments with smaller buy-ins and sizeable wins to grow their bankroll. They then go on to risk it in tourneys with bigger buy-ins and even better payout potential. Once they get noticed, they can go on to receive sponsorships. Other professionals have done self-promotion via Twitch accounts, allowing them to live-stream their games and creating a brand for themselves.

What are the biggest poker tourney payouts to date? In 2012, Antonio Esfandiari took the top spot in the WSOP’s Big One for One Drop tournament, earning him a record-setting $18.3 million. Other outstanding wins include Jamie Gold’s $12 million first prize in the 2006 WSOP main event, Martin Jacobson’s $10 million win in the 2014 WSOP main event and Daniel Colman’s $15.3 million win in the 2014 WSOP Big One for One Drop tournament.

Any professional poker player will tell you that while luck certainly plays a part, skill and experience are big factors too. A safe space to practise your skills is at virtual online poker tables. Many online casinos like Gaming Club also offer Live Dealer tables, where you can compete against other players in a real time environment while interacting with a live croupier. Video and audio streaming technology has made this one of the most popular ways for players to up their skills and improve their game.

If you’re a mediocre poker player and find that your skills aren’t up to scratch to compete with the pros, there are other ways to chase big wins. Progressive slots have been turning regular players into overnight millionaires since the dawn of online casinos more than 20 years ago.

According to the Guinness World Records, the biggest single jackpot payout to date was won by UK player, Jon Heywood, in October 2015. He struck pure gold with a £13,209,300 ($20,062,600) win on the popular Mega Moolah progressive slot. And the largest jackpot ever won on a mobile device, €7.9 million, was on the very same game, earlier this year.

So the answer to the initial question is a resounding yes, online casinos can reap equally great financial rewards, if luck is on your side. And if you choose a reputable online casino like Gaming Club, you’ll have a wide variety of progressive jackpot slots to choose from, including the millionaire-making Mega Moolah, Treasure Nile, King Cashalot and Major Millions. No skill or massive buy-in is required, which evens the playing field. All you need to do is sign up, fund your account and spin till you hopefully strike a lucky win. Fingers crossed!

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